How to Avoid Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination, in the United States, that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual harassment occurs when one employee makes continued, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, to another employee, against his or her wishes.

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Sexual harassment occurs when one employee makes continued, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, to another employee, against his or her wishes.

According to a current issues update from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), sexual harassment occurs, “when submission to or rejection of this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment.” [Read more…]

Hope for the Baby-Boomer

By Phin Upham

There is something unique about the baby-boomer generation, and it has nothing to do with the fact that they were born after the end of World War II. In the article, “Reinventing Middle Age,” Daphne Merkin suggests that the baby-boomers are unique because they belong to the “New Middle Ages.” According to Merkin, they were the first generation to be introduced to middle age “as a sustained mentality.”

As a baby-boomer, she writes, “We came of age convinced that life — far from being the vale of tears that people who lived in the Old Middle Ages conceived it to be — was supposed to make us happy in some ineffable but all the same transporting way.”

Although most of the article has a bleak outlook on the generation, it ends with encouragement and hope in the words of Bruce Springsteen: “So you’re scared and you’re thinking/That maybe we ain’t that young anymore. Show a little faith, there’s magic in the night.”

Read the entire article: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/magazine/06WWLN-Lede-t.html?_r=1&


Phin Upham is an investor from NYC and SF. You may contact Phin on his Phin Upham website or LinkedIn page.

What Are Certified Pre-Owned Cars?

The first thing that you must realize is how certified pre-owned cars differ from regular used car sales. When an older car model is traded to a car dealer that vehicle becomes a part of the dealer’s fleet of used cars. The car dealer can make the decision to either keep the vehicle and resell to a potential customer, or get rid of it if he feels that it is not profitable to him.

What Are Certified Pre-Owned Cars?

To attract more potential customers, used car dealers began listing their cars as pre-driven and pre-owned. They wanted to change consumers opinions that buying a used car was like buying a pile of worthless junk. During the late 80’s Mercedes-Benz car dealers started using the term “certified pre-owned luxury cars” to boost their used car sales, which peaked consumers interests. Automakers came up with the brilliant idea that used car dealers should inspect and make repairs on their trade-ins and pay for the repairs. Then the automaker would offer the used car dealer a warranty on their certified pre-owned cars.

When you’re searching for a used car from a respectable car dealer, make certain that you know the difference between factory and dealer certified cars. For example, when you see a car listed as certified pre-owned factory, this means the car’s warranty is backed by the factory and no cost will be incurred by you. On the other hand, cars listed as certified pre-owned dealer means you may have to buy an extended warranty for the car to ensure coverage on it.

Buying a certified pre-owned car will help you save money and give you peace of mind knowing that the vehicle has been inspected and repaired. And includes a warranty for repairs if something goes wrong with it.